Staffing Agencies Key In Temporary Workers Safety

Temporary workers need to stay safe, too

The holidays are a key time for retailers and other businesses — such as delivery companies — to employ temporary workers. Sure, these employees may be new on the job and require quicker training in order to serve hordes of holiday shoppers as soon as possible. But these seasonal employees are still entitled to compensation if injured at work, as is a permanent worker.

That’s where staffing agencies come in. Read more

Light Duty Pitfalls Demand Compliance

In workers’ compensation, we often hear the term “light duty.” This is also referred to as modified duty or limited duty. After you are injured at work, your doctor may give you a note letting your employer know you are to work light duty — modified duties of your original job.

But what does that mean, exactly?

And what should you know about it to protect your rights and avoid risking your workers’ compensation case?
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Workplace Violence & Workman’s Compensation

We tend to think of workers’ compensation cases as accidents, But what about workman’s compensation and violence?

There are four generally recognized areas of workplace violence, according to HRDailyAdvisor.blr.com. Criminal intent is when the perpetrator isn’t necessarily connected with the company or employees, but is violent and commits a crime. In some situations, a customer or client is the perpetrator. The third type is when an employee attacks another at work; and lastly, when the perpetrator has a relationship with an employee, but not the business.

Reports show that professions like law enforcement and healthcare have higher numbers of workplace violence.
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When housing is part of a worker’s wages

A recent Eustis news development has brought to light certain aspects of Florida’s Workers’ Compensation Law. We thought it was a good time to revisit what happens when room and board is included as part of a worker’s wages under an employment agreement.

The story: Florida’s Lake County Commission approved a plan for a farm to build a dormitory for laborers from Central America. Liner Source Inc. is a family-owned, wholesale plant nursery. The proposed 46,000-square-foot building would house nearly 200 farm workers working on H-2A visas. On this kind of visa, laborers can work in the U.S. for up to 10 months.

What happens, then, if a worker is getting housing from his or her employer, and is injured on the job? Read more

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